VR/AR Devices

Virtual reality (VR) is an interactive computer-generated experience taking place within a simulated environment. Augmented reality (AR) is an interactive experience of a real-world environment whereby the objects that reside in the real-world are “augmented” by computer-generated perceptual information. Learn and Buy VR/AR Products and Accessories on GeekyViews.

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VR/AR Devices

Virtual reality (VR) is an interactive computer-generated experience taking place within a simulated environment, that incorporates mainly auditory and visual, but also other types of sensory feedback like haptic. This immersive environment can be similar to the real world or it can be fantastical, creating an experience that is not possible in ordinary physical reality. Augmented reality systems may also be considered a form of VR that layers virtual information over a live camera feed into a headset or through a smartphone or tablet device giving the user the ability to view three-dimensional images.

Current VR technology most commonly uses virtual reality headsets or multi-projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations that simulate a user’s physical presence in a virtual or imaginary environment. A person using virtual reality equipment is able to “look around” the artificial world, move around in it, and interact with virtual features or items. The effect is commonly created by VR headsets consisting of a head-mounted display with a small screen in front of the eyes, but can also be created through specially designed rooms with multiple large screens.

VR systems that include transmission of vibrations and other sensations to the user through a game controller or other devices are known as haptic systems. This tactile information is generally known as force feedback in medical, video gaming and military training applications. 

Some of the VR Devices are:

Oculus Rift – The Oculus Rift is a virtual reality headset developed and manufactured by Oculus VR, a division of Facebook Inc. The Rift has gone through various pre-production models since the Kickstarter campaign, around five of which were demonstrated to the public. Two of these models were shipped to backers, labeled as ‘development kits’; the DK1 in mid 2013 and DK2 in mid 2014, to give developers a chance to develop content in time for the Rift’s release. However, both were also purchased by a large number of enthusiasts who wished to get an early preview of the technology. The Rift has two Pentile OLED displays, 1080×1200 resolution per eye, a 90 Hz refresh rate, and 110° field of view. The device also features rotational and positional tracking and integrated headphones that provide a 3D audio effect.

HTC Vive – The HTC Vive is a virtual reality headset developed by HTC and Valve Corporation. The headset uses “room scale” tracking technology, allowing the user to move in 3D space and use motion-tracked handheld controllers to interact with the environment. Prototypes of a Valve-produced virtual reality system were demonstrated during 2014. On 23 February 2015, Valve announced SteamVR and that it would demonstrate a “SteamVR hardware system” at the 2015 Game Developers Conference.

Samsung Gear VR – The Samsung Gear VR is a mobile virtual reality headset developed by Samsung Electronics, in collaboration with Oculus, and manufactured by Samsung. The headset was released on November 27, 2015.

When in use, a compatible Samsung Galaxy device (Galaxy Note 5, Galaxy S6/S6 Edge/S6 Edge+, Galaxy S7/S7 Edge, Galaxy S8/S8+, Galaxy Note FE, Galaxy Note 8, Galaxy A8/A8+ or Galaxy S9/S9+ is required. The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 was discontinued from the Gear VR Line) acts as the headset’s display and processor, while the Gear VR unit itself acts as the controller, which contains the field of view, as well as a custom inertial measurement unit, or IMU, for rotational tracking, which connects to the smartphone via USB-C or micro-USB. The Gear VR headset also includes a touchpad and back button on the side, as well as a proximity sensor to detect when the headset is on.

Google Cardboard – Google Cardboard is a virtual reality (VR) platform developed by Google for use with a head mount for a smartphone. Named for its fold-out cardboard viewer, the platform is intended as a low-cost system to encourage interest and development in VR applications. Users can either build their own viewer from simple, low-cost components using specifications published by Google or purchase a re-manufactured one. To use the platform, users run Cardboard-compatible applications on their phone, place the phone into the back of the viewer, and view content through the lenses.

Google Glass – Google Glass is a brand of smart glasses – an optical head-mounted display designed in the shape of a pair of eyeglasses. It was developed by X (previously Google X) with the mission of producing a ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displayed information in a smartphone-like, hands-free format. Wearers communicated with the Internet via natural language voice commands.

Holo Lens – Microsoft HoloLens, known under development as Project Baraboo, is a pair of mixed reality smart glasses developed and manufactured by Microsoft. HoloLens gained popularity[citation needed] for being one of the first computers running the Windows Mixed Reality platform under the Windows 10 operating system. The HoloLens can trace its lineage to Kinect, an add-on for Microsoft’s Xbox gaming console that was introduced in 2010.

Lenovo Mirage – The Lenovo Mirage Solo is a collaboration between Lenovo and Google, and it’s the only WorldSense-powered headset on the market since HTC canceled plans for a Daydream device last year. It uses the same interface as Google’s phone-powered Daydream View mobile headset; supports the existing 350-app Daydream catalog; and uses the same small plastic remote, which — unlike the headset — has a basic internal motion sensor instead of full tracking. Daydream uses the standard Google Play Store, so you can buy and install Mirage Solo apps from your desktop, or sign in to a Wi-Fi network and download them directly, the way you would on any Android device.

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